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Django + Wagtail: The Perfect Combination for Your Next Web Project

Django + Wagtail: The Perfect Combination for Your Next Web Project

Samer Mahamid's photo
Samer Mahamid
·Dec 12, 2022·

4 min read

Are you a Django developer looking for a content management system (CMS) to use on your next web project? Look no further than Wagtail.

Wagtail is a CMS built on top of Django. It leverages the power and flexibility of Django, while providing an intuitive and user-friendly interface for managing content on your website. This means that as a developer, you can focus on building the core functionality and features of your web application, without spending as much time and effort on content management.

One of the key advantages of using Django and Wagtail together is the ability to customize and extend the CMS to fit your specific needs. Wagtail is built with a modular and pluggable architecture, so you can easily add or remove features and functionality as needed. This allows you to create a CMS that is tailored to your project, rather than trying to fit your project into a one-size-fits-all CMS.

Another great benefit of using Django and Wagtail together is the wealth of available resources and support. As an open-source framework, Wagtail has a thriving community of developers and users who share tips, advice, and code snippets. And as a Django developer, you already have access to the vast resources and knowledge of the Django community.

Real-World Examples of Django and Wagtail in Action

What do Django and Wagtail look like in action? Here are a few examples of real-world projects that use these frameworks.

One example of a project using Django and Wagtail is the Royal Opera House website. The Royal Opera House is a world-renowned performing arts venue in London, and their website is built using Django and Wagtail. The site features a variety of content, including information about upcoming performances, ticket sales, and behind-the-scenes videos and photos. And with Wagtail, the Royal Opera House team can easily manage and update the content on their website.

Another example of a project using Django and Wagtail is the Tor project website. The Tor project is a nonprofit organization that provides free and open-source tools for internet privacy and anonymity. Their website is built using Django and Wagtail, and it features a variety of content, including information about the organization, their tools and services, and ways to get involved and support their work.

A third example of a project using Django and Wagtail is the National Trust website. The National Trust is a UK conservation charity that protects and preserves historic places and spaces. Their website is built using Django and Wagtail, and it features a variety of content, including information about the places and spaces they protect, events and activities, and ways to support their work.

These are just a few examples of the many projects that use Django and Wagtail in the real world. And with their combined power and flexibility, you can create a web application that is tailored to your specific needs and is easy to manage and maintain.

Example code:


# Import the necessary modules and classes
from django.db import models
from wagtail.admin.edit_handlers import FieldPanel, MultiFieldPanel
from wagtail.core.models import Page

# Define a custom page type for a blog post
class BlogPostPage(Page):
    # Define the fields for the page
    body = models.TextField()
    date = models.DateField()
    author = models.CharField(max_length=255)

    # Define the panels for the page in the Wagtail admin interface
    content_panels = [
        FieldPanel('title'),
        FieldPanel('body'),
        FieldPanel('date'),
        FieldPanel('author'),
    ]

    # Define the parent page type(s) that this page type can be created under
    parent_page_types = ['home.HomePage']

In this example, we define a custom page type called BlogPostPage that extends the Page model provided by Wagtail. We define the fields, panels, and parent page types for the page, and we can use this page type to create and manage blog posts in the Wagtail admin interface. This is just one example of how you can use the Page model to create custom page types in your Django and Wagtail web application.

So why not give Django and Wagtail a try on your next web project? With their combined power and flexibility, you'll be able to create a web application that is tailored to your specific needs and is easy to manage and maintain. And be sure to join the Hashnode community to connect with other Django and Wagtail enthusiasts and share your experiences and insights. Happy coding!

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